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Monday, November 4, 2013

IBM supercomputer simulates 530 billion neurons and a whole lot of synapses 11-04


IBM Brain In The Machine: A “Cognitive Milestone”

Neurosynaptic Cores This network of neurosynaptic cores is derived from wiring in the monkey brain.
Neurosynaptic Cores This network of neurosynaptic cores is derived from wiring in the monkey brain.
IBM Research Almaden  unveiled has the world’s grandest simulation of a brain  , running on 96 supercomputers at Super computing 2012  .  That’s half a trillion neurons and a hundred trillion synapses.
The initial goal of the project, code-named Compass, is far more ambitious than anything previously attempted, and actually features almost 10x as many neurons as there are in a human brain. Science News Daily called it a “cognitive milestone,” and Popular Science writes that IBM’s “cognitive computing program… just hit a major high.”
To do it, IBM used its cognitive computing chips unveiled last year.  They are designed to recreate the phenomena between spiking neurons and synapses. More than 2 billion of these cores were divided into 77 brain-inspired regions, with gray matter and white matter connectivity, according to IBM.

IBM supercomputer simulates 530 billion neurons and a whole lot of synapses





IBM Research, in collaboration with DARPA's Systems of Neuromorphic Adaptive Plastic Scalable Electronics (SyNAPSE) program, has reached another brain simulation milestone. Powered by its new TrueNorth system on the world's second fastest supercomputer, IBM was capable of crafting a 2.084 billion neurosynaptic cores and 100 trillion synapses -- all at a speed "only" 1,542 times slower than real life. The abstract explains that this isn't a biologically realistic simulation of the human brain, but rather mathematically abstracted -- and little more dour -- versions steered towards maximizing function and minimizing cost. DARPA's SyNAPSE project aims to tie together supercomputing, neuroscience and neurotech for a future cognitive computing architecture far beyond what's running behind your PC screen at the moment. Want to know more? We've included IBM's video explanation of cognitive computing after the break.